Will the new KiwiBuild visa cut the mustard for migrant workers?

KiwiBuild visa changes

On the 27th of June the Government announced it is revising the KiwiBuild visa scheme and changing immigration settings to try to address New Zealand’s shortage in construction workers. But will these changes address the issues?

New Zealand as a destination is a difficult sell even for large construction companies. It takes a lot to get a builder from the UK to move to New Zealand, where the cost of living is high but the wages are not.

It’s even harder if you can’t offer that person the certainty of residence. If the potential talent that might be recruited using these schemes can’t get a residence visa, the ability of employers to attract that talent will be compromised.

Continue reading Will the new KiwiBuild visa cut the mustard for migrant workers?

Kiwibuild visa replaced with new Kiwibuild skills shortage list

The Government has scrapped its KiwiBuild Visa plan in favour of wider proposed changes to immigration settings to fix a 30,000 worker gap in construction.

The government-is trying to make the process easier for employers to recruit the staff they need to work in construction and fast track the immigration process for workers who meet the right criteria.

The proposed changes include a KiwiBuild Skills Shortages list which would set up a simplified process for employers to quickly hire overseas workers in critical roles without Immigration NZ needing to conduct a market test each time.

Continue reading Kiwibuild visa replaced with new Kiwibuild skills shortage list

Migrant employers need to get the record straight…

Migrant employers need to get the record straight…

Employers hiring migrants have been making headlines lately for breaching immigration and employment law. Leading immigration lawyer Aaron Martin and solicitor Eleanor Gregan of Davenports Harbour Law discuss the most common mistakes made by migrant employers and how to avoid them.

From 1 April 2017, employers who incur a penalty for breaching employment standards have faced a stand-down period preventing them from recruiting migrant labour. The stand-down period is for six months, one year, 18 months, or two years, depending on the severity of the breach.

Continue reading Migrant employers need to get the record straight…

Aaron Martin Review

“We used NZIL to get our permanent resident visa’s.

Before meeting Aaron, I had been in contact with another Immigration firm who I felt didn’t seem to have the in-depth knowledge about what to do that we got from Aaron.

From making an initial website inquiry, Aaron was proactive and knowledgeable. Every step of the process Aaron and his team have been very professional and easy to deal with and unlike with previous lawyers we did not have to continuously chase up, they were very proactive and on top of our application. Thank you, Aaron and team.” Rebecca Weeks

Demand for labour vs work visa numbers – the Government’s rock and hard place

Demand for labour vs work visa numbers – the Government’s rock and hard place

It’s time to get real:

  • Auckland needs skilled labour
  • Employers in Auckland need to be able to retain staff.

The new budget will be announced on the 17th of May and one of the most critical issues facing the government is how they going to tackle the immigration limits they campaigned on setting, vs economic growth.

Continue reading Demand for labour vs work visa numbers – the Government’s rock and hard place

Stop the cynical political point scoring- its time to address the real issues…

Principle lawyer at NZIL  Aaron Martin, weighs in on the recent comments in the media from Michael Woodhouse about a suggested amnesty for illegal construction workers.

The criticism by National Party spokesman for Immigration, Michael Woodhouse, of the current Minister for possibly looking at an amnesty is cynical political points scoring of the worst order.

Continue reading Stop the cynical political point scoring- its time to address the real issues…

It’s a skill shortage, dummy, not a labour shortage…

Recently unions have been griping about ex-expatriate workers being brought in to complete transmission gully. They really ought to be more in tune with the labour market.

Employers need to satisfy strict requirements to bring in workers from overseas. When supporting work visa applications, employers have to show Immigration New Zealand that they have made a “genuine attempt” to recruit locally. And the folks at Immigration New Zealand are no pushovers. They frequently challenge applications based on the nature of advertising, the recruitment processes, and the extent of the advertising. They also ask about the employer’s training programmes to reduce reliance on overseas workers. They ask why an existing staff member cannot be trained into the role.

Continue reading It’s a skill shortage, dummy, not a labour shortage…

Storm in a teacup

Workers in demand have always been able to be recruited offshore.

Property developers Fu Wah have been in the news lately for moves to recruit construction workers from China. The Beijing-based construction company is applying for short-term work visas for 200 workers to complete the fit-out of new luxury Auckland hotel Park Hyatt by March next year.

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Major bureaucratic flaws in New Zealand’s immigration system

Leading Auckland immigration lawyer Aaron Martin knows from extensive experience with clients exactly where the frustrations and incompetencies of the current process lie. He has some suggestions for the new Government about where its focus should be when it comes to immigration.

The Labour Party election campaign focused on positive messages. So I eagerly looked forward to an equally positive message from the new Minister of Immigration. But in an article on the Newsroom website on 1 December the Minister started on a negative: the immigration system was broken and required more money to catch those who try to shaft it.

Continue reading Major bureaucratic flaws in New Zealand’s immigration system

Time to ask for a pay rise…

If you want to be granted a Skilled Migrant Category Residence visa in 2018 you should check your eligibility against the new Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment SMC criteria.

Last week, the MBIE updated the SMC visa and changed the remuneration (payment) threshold that will meet the eligible criteria for migrants.

Continue reading Time to ask for a pay rise…